Game Review: Aviary Attorney

There are games that are obvious attempts to cash in on another franchise’s popularity, and there are games that are obviously a loving homage to its parent franchise. The difference between the two is often a matter of who you ask.

Aviary Attorney is an obvious homage to the Ace Attorney series, only with birds. As defense attorney JayJay Falcon, you’ll explore 1840s France on the cusp of a revolution. Whether France is consumed by revolution or not is up to you.

Oh, and there are bird puns, tons of bird puns.

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If you’ve played any of the Ace Attorney games, the basic flow of the game should be familiar to you, although Aviary Attorney is much closer to a pure visual novel. This is one game that definitely wears its influences on its sleeve. You’ll still be investigating, gathering evidence, pointing out contradictions and the like, but instead of scrutinizing every individual line of testimony, you’re given a transcript and asked to point out contradictions. Also unlike Ace Attorney is that the story continues if you lose cases (albeit it becomes much darker). You’re also on the clock, so if you spend too much time wandering around, there’s a good chance you’ll lack evidence for a trial, and the game is surprisingly strict about this. I ended up losing the second case because I visited a certain location early and ate up a valuable time slot. Even though I went back and tried to do the chapter over, I still couldn’t get the exact sequence of events down and gave up because I’m impatient like that.

The character designs are taken from the work of J. J. Grandville, who I am actually familiar with through his art being used for the Fantastic Menagerie Tarot and the Victorian Flower Oracle. The music is by the romantic-era composer Camille Saint-Saëns, whose work adds a certain grandeur to the setting. The graphics are in a sepia style that have an old sketchbook kind of appeal.

Although I liked this game, I do have a couple criticisms. The ending you get is based on the outcome of the third case, so you can theoretically bumble your way through the other cases and still end up with a good ending. Also I never thought I’d say this, but the bird puns sort of wore out their welcome by the third case, and I felt like the game has a hard time deciding whether it wanted to be a barrel of laughs or dark and serious. It felt like it just didn’t know when to put on each mask, unlike its inspiration, Ace Attorney, which can go from courtroom antics to serious drama in a matter of moments, Aviary Attorney doesn’t seem to know what it wants to do. Part of it is probably due to length, I was able to get a decent ending in four hours. Understandably, that’s not a lot of time to immerse players in sweeping drama.

I don’t want it to sound like I hated the game. It definitely scratched the AA itch, and I recommend it to anyone who’s waiting for Ace Attorney 6, but I want to emphasize that it’s a fleeting experience and at times it seems like it doesn’t know what it wants to be. I would definitely recommend picking this one up on sale if you’re interested. IMHO the price is a little steep considering its length. If you really want a game to scratch that AA itch, I’ve definitely played worse than Aviary Attorney.

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