Deck Review: The Magic of Flowers Oracle

One thing I can never have enough of is plant-based decks. I love trees, I love flowers, they make great themed decks. The problem is finding art that appeals to me and finding a price point that isn’t “ridiculously expensive”.

Initially I was drawn to this deck’s bright colours but was hesitant to pick it up but wasn’t sure about the author. I had only skimmed one of her books, The Magic of Flowers and Bach flower remedies, the Law of Attraction and manifestation just isn’t my thing. This video review by Arwen is what convinced me to buy it, and I recommend giving it a look to see if it’s your thing.

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The set includes 44 cards and 264 page book. The cards are what I’ve come to think of as standard Llewellyn size (same as the Green Witch Tarot, I just checked). The author is Tess Whitehurst and the artist is Anne Wertheim. The companion book doesn’t have unique spreads, just instructions for one and three card readings. The entries for each card has its name, a black and white image, key phrase, magical applications, a few paragraphs about the meaning of the card in a reading, and some more specific ideas and messages for each card. There’s also a space to write notes. The cards themselves are borderless apart from a footer that has the name of the flower. The backs are bright purple with a compass rose and different flowers at the points, they are non-reversible but the book doesn’t use reversed meanings. Many of the flowers in this deck are common flowers that you will see in many gardens in North America, such as rose or tulip, although some were unfamiliar to me.

The artwork is the main draw of this deck for me. I love the bright, vibrant colours and the level of detail in the images, but despite the detail, the images don’t feel cluttered, although without the keywords, some would be difficult to recognize unless you’re familiar with that flower. One of my favourite cards is “Crocus” which depicts a wintery scene with a woman walking towards a gazebo. “Carnation” is a fiery card, depicting a woman emerging from the flower, wreathed by flames and arms open wide. “Morning Glory” is a transitional card, depicting the sunrise through a gateway surrounded by the titular flower.

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Unfortunately, while the companion book has a bunch of suggestions for how to use the cards, the messages are often steeped in New Age jargon which might make it difficult to interpret. One of the more difficult cards for me was “Dandelion” which is all about manifestation and the Law of Attraction which was difficult to interpret for friends who not only didn’t believe in the Law of Attraction but saw it as thinly disguised classism. Although, I will say that some messages resonated with me. Another unfortunate thing about this deck (which strikes me as a missed opportunity) is that the book seldom references the art. This deck would probably work best as an affirmation or spellcasting deck. The positive messages in this deck would also make it a good self-care or “pick me up” deck. If you know the symbolic associations of each flower, you could also bring those into play. This is one deck that I wish had keywords, because sometimes the meaning isn’t that apparent from looking at the card image, particularly Rose, which seems to be going for a stained glass window weird mandala look, and seems out of place in the deck. This is personally disappointing for me as someone who loves roses, and I almost didn’t buy the deck due to that one card.

In terms of diversity, a few cards unambiguously depict people of colour, including Bouganvillea, Impatiens, and Dahlia (and others), while others, like Carnation, are more ambiguous. The characters are mostly women, although Sunflower and Yarrow both feature men and others don’t depict any humans at all. The only questionable images in this deck that I found are the cover image, depicting a white lady in the “royal ease” position and the Sunflower card, which depicts an apparently Native American man in a loincloth, which is all kinds of nope.

Overall, this is a very pretty deck that is let down by reliance on New Age jargon and a couple of unfortunate choices in imagery. I would tentatively recommend it to anyone who likes their plant decks bright and colourful. For something a little more subdued, I recommend checking out my review of the Flower Reading Cards, which is forthcoming.

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