Review: Rosemary and Rue (October Daye #1)

It’s time for the latest entry in “books I bought because tumblr friends said they were good” lately this strategy has been hit or miss. As I’ve discovered, some of the folks I follow on tumblr have very different tastes than I do. In fact, I bet if you tallied the positive vs. negative reviews of books recommended to me by tumblr friends, there would probably be a few more negatives.

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The world of Faerie never disappeared. It exists parallel to our own, protected by secrecy. When the human world and Faerie intersect, changelings are born, belonging to neither world. October Daye is one such changeling, but after getting burned by both sides of her heritage, all she wants is to live as normal a life as possible. Naturally, she’s drawn back into faerie politics when Countess Evening Winterrose, one of the more powerful fairies in San Francisco (and Toby’s sometime friend) is murdered, her dying curse binding Toby to find the murderer, or die trying.

I found most of the characters likeable. Toby’s been through hell and she’s just trying to live a normal life after what she’s been through (as usual, that doesn’t last long), but there are some really great secondary characters: October’s good friend Lily, an undine who lives in the Japanese tea garden in Golden Gate Park, to Sylvester, Toby’s liege lord, his wife Luna and their acerbic daughter Rayseline, to Tybalt, a Cait Sidhe with whom she shares a mutual dislike. Toby’s world is populated by a variety of creatures drawn from world mythology, from selkies to kitsune to rose goblins.There are a couple characters I’d really like to mention, but that would be spoiler territory.

The world of faerie, so close to our own, is both magical and dangerous, with magnificent gardens of glass flowers, doors that open to places you weren’t expecting to be, and denizens who are sticklers for protocol and take hospitality very seriously. Changelings like Toby naturally occupy a dubious space in either sidhe and human society, not quite belonging to both and struggling to live in either. Toby’s position as a knight errant to a sidhe liege lord is something of a novelty.

This book had me hooked from the prologue. In fact, it’s one of the best prologues I’ve ever read. I was definitely not expecting what happened and it explains why October didn’t want anything to do with Faerie and had to be dragged back into it by her not-quite-friend’s death. I also like that the plot wasn’t overly focused on romance, there are some sexual tension laden scenes between October and a few men, but she doesn’t have a lot of time for romance.

Unfortunately, while the prologue is strong, I found the plot loses momentum. For a private investigator, October doesn’t really do any serious investigating and spends most of her time getting shot, nearly bleeding out, and having to be rescued by other characters. October’s circumstances remind me of a recent post I saw on tumblr, which talked about how some protagonists have the plot happen to them, and this is definitely what I felt happened in October’s case: she doesn’t so much drive the plot, the plot happens to her and she reacts to it. The Big Bad in this book was obvious to me from their introduction, and all it really took to uncover them was October remembering her powers. Speaking of her powers, they seem inconsistent, one moment she can’t maintain a simple illusion without experiencing a splitting headache, the next she’s using her abilities with no issues (although this is explained by coming into contact with a magical artifact, I thought there was a point where the effect wore off). My other criticism is that even though this is the first novel in the series, there are many references to past events. Occasionally these sort of references can be used to give a sense of history to the world, but in this case this first novel feels like the fifth in a series. (Note that although she has written prequel stories, I’m reading each book in order of publication.)

Unfortunately, while there are a lot of different types of fae, there aren’t any explicitly marked people of colour (although my impression of Lily was that she was at least half-Japanese), the only reference to queer sexualities is one character’s offhand comment that he slept with a (male) faerie, although based on what I’ve heard, there’s more queer representation in other books in the series and the author self-identifies as bisexual.

In terms of triggers, Devin, the man in charge of the halfway house for changelings where October used to live, is implicitly and explicitly abusive to his charges. There’s also some blood-drinking (sidhe can drink blood to experience the memories of dead people), and violence.

Overall, I enjoyed this book and the preview for the next one was genuinely intriguing. I can safely say I’m hooked and I can’t wait to catch up with it. If you’re a fan of urban fantasy, you’ve probably read it already. If you like urban fantasy that focuses on something other than vampires, check out this series.

 

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