Review: Arrows of the Queen (Heralds of Valdemar #1)

Ever since reading The Last Herald-Mage trilogy I’ve made it a goal to read the entire mass of novels set in Valdemar. I’ve actually been sitting on the omnibus containing the debut trilogy (Arrows of the Queen/Arrow’s Flight/Arrow’s Fall) since January of last year. Better late than never, right?

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A daughter of the repressive Holderfolk, Talia’s fate is to marry young and produce children for a husband of her father’s choosing, she is saved from this fate by Rolan, one of the mystical horse-like beings called Companions who Choose people with potential to become the legendary Heralds of Valdemar. Talia finds herself thrust into a new world of combat training, classes, and dealing with her emerging Gifts, but when an old conspiracy threatens her life, Talia must learn to make use of her mercurial gifts before she becomes the conspiracy’s latest victim.

This story is the very definition of a coming-of-age story: person with a tragic backstory discovers they are Special in some way and leaves that life to start afresh somewhere. It’s an old staple that a lot of authors rely upon (like say, me, for instance) and there’s nothing inherently wrong with relying on old staples. I should note, however, that this book was first published in 1987, when at least a few of its ideas must have seemed fresh.

Anyways, so Talia basically goes from being forced to marry whomever her father chooses for her (Holderfolk are very much like that fundamentalist offshoot of the Mormon church) to being the new girl at Herald school. What separates her from the majority of young female protagonists (especially YA protagonists) is that she actually manages to make friends with other girls. This is from a novel published in 1987. I know right? Naturally, because she is the protagonist, she has a Special Destiny, in her case, to become the Queen’s Own Herald, A.K.A. the Herald the Monarch depends on to tell them to get their shit together. Talia’s other job, besides attending classes, is to help the Heir to the throne (assuming a Companion Chooses her, as the Monarch and the Heir must be Heralds), Elspeth, who is known as the Brat, be less of a brat, and that’s before dealing with the conspiracy that killed her predecessor and wants her dead.

It’s difficult to talk about the plot not because I didn’t like the book, but because there isn’t a whole lot of plot to be had. Talia is in training to be a Herald, after all, so she spends much of her time attending classes, angsting over her lack of self-confidence, making friends, losing friends, and trying to get a grip on her Gifts. There is a plot involving a conspiracy that is the source of some tense moments, but the machinations of the wider world outside of the Collegium aren’t Talia’s concern at this time. Since this was the first published book in the series, there’s naturally a lot of exposition. The real focus of the book is its characters: Talia herself, Rolan, twin instructors Teren and Keren, Sherill, the first person Talia meets at the Collegium (besides the Dean), Queen Selanay, and her daughter Elspeth are just a few of the great characters in this book. While they aren’t incredibly complex (I remarked in my review of The Last Herald-Mage trilogy that you can sum up the characters in a sentence), but by the end of the book you feel like you’ve grown along with them. They feel like old friends. I especially like how Lackey subverts your expectations regarding Skif and his relationship with Talia.

It’s really weird reading this book after The Last Herald-Mage trilogy (which chronologically takes place before this one) when Vanyel (and Stefen) have become legends and things are a little different now that there are no more Herald-Mages. Just FYI, I’m reading the books in order of publication, chronologically, Arrows of the Queen is more like #34 in reading order.

One of my main criticisms of this book was that I felt the resolution to the conspiracy plot was anticlimactic and obvious setup for the next two books. While there are a few same-sex couples in this book (which was notable at the time) only one gets a bittersweet ending. Talia spends an annoying amount of time doubting herself, while this is not in and of itself a flaw, I felt like Lackey got the point across the second time it came up in the text. As with The Last Herald-Mage, the frequent P.O.V. switches between paragraphs were jarring but tolerable.

In terms of potentially triggering things, Talia grows up in a repressive patriarchal culture where her elders want to marry her off at thirteen. It’s heavily implied that a minor character was raped as a child. The way Talia makes young Elspeth behave is by spanking her (and telling a servant to hit her back when she hits her with a brush), which, while “normal” for the time it was written, might be off-putting to readers these days.

Overall, it’s difficult to accuse this book of being cliche when its probably inspired a bunch of those cliches. As a first book in a trilogy, it’s decent, not the most exciting first book I’ve ever read but good enough to keep me coming back for more.

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