Review: An Artificial Night (October Daye #3)

Fresh off her last big assignment, October “Toby” Daye barely has time to rest before trouble finds her again. Someone’s been stealing children from mortal and fae alike, and all signs point to Blind Michael, the leader of the Wild Hunt. Unfortunately, getting to him won’t be easy, as there are few roads that lead to his realm, each one can only be taken once, and some roads demand a more heavy toll than others, and once she’s in, she can only stay so long before her magical protection burns away and she’s at the mercy of the land’s formidable fae lord. To make matters worse, May Daye, her own personal Fetch and harbinger of her coming death, has suddenly appeared on Toby’s doorstep.

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I wouldn’t say the first two books in this series were a slog but they certainly had their slow points. This one kept me glued to the page. This one has a bit more action and tension, and of the three, this one is definitely the most “fairy tale” like. There’s a set of instructions the protagonist needs to follow in order to pass safely through Blind Michael’s realm. Blind Michael himself follows some very specific rules. Before this book there have been hints of fae protocol (like how you should never say “thank you”) but this book really highlights how Faerie is different from the mortal realm. I also really liked May as a character. As a Fetch, she shares many of Toby’s memories, but she also has more of a bubbly personality than our protagonist. I think Quentin and the Luidaeg are my favourites out of the recurring characters thus far.

I’ve criticized the series so far for October’s lack of investigative work and how the plot seems to happen to her. She takes more of an active role in this book, actually taking the initiative when she’s thrown a curve ball, though she still finds herself in situations where she needs rescuing. It’s not that I’m against characters who need rescuing, it’s just that it seems to happen more frequently to Toby Daye than it should. This book feels more like Toby is coming into her own. The word “hero” is repeated so often it gets annoying, but it really feels like Toby is starting to be the hero of her own story, so to speak. Another thing I like is the lack of a strong romantic subplot. While Toby does interact with men (including an ex) romantically, she doesn’t really have time to spend pages pining over men, unlike some other protagonists who by book three are usually juggling three love interests or at least trying to decide (because polyamory is never an option) between two love interests.

As far as complaints about the narrative, I felt like one of the twists in the second half of the book felt like the author was making excuses for October to put herself in harm’s way again, and the final confrontation seemed anticlimactic. It reminded me of the end of the College of Winterhold quest line in Skyrim, where I stood there and said “wait, that’s it?” but at least there wasn’t as much stumbling around and waiting for the plot to happen.

In terms of triggers, there is violence against children. Toby is physically abused by the antagonist (who also abused his wife). This book is a bit bloodier than the previous books, and at one point Toby describes bleeding from cuts all over her body. There is also a bit of body horror with children being turned into animals. When I say this book is like a fairy tale, I mean it in the sense of “sometimes horrifying story intended for adults” the way that uncensored fairy stories tend to be.

In terms of diversity, there’s Raj, Tybalt’s nephew, who is described as having bronze skin, but once again we have a dead Japanese girl and Blind Michael, the major antagonist, is, well, blind. I wish McGuire would stop killing off her characters of colour. Another thing I wish she’d stop doing is I wish she’d stop equating mental illness with evil (like with Rayseline). Although I doubt that’s going to happen soon.

The first two books in this series were good but this one seriously hooked me. It definitely has some flaws (like consistently failing on the diversity front) but even so I still couldn’t put it down, and I think that speaks volumes for the writing, the world, and the characters in particular.

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