Review: Late Eclipses (October Daye #4)

Sometimes I’ll decide to read a long running, in progress book series, and I’ll feel as if the plot and characters would’ve had a greater impact on me if I’d had a year to wait between books (for them to come out in paperback, at least). This is pretty much how I feel about Late Eclipses in a nutshell.

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Two years ago, Toby Daye thought she could leave Faerie behind, now she finds herself back in the service of Duke Sylvester Torquill and sharing an apartment with her Fetch. When her friend Lily comes down with a mysterious, seemingly impossible illness, however, she soon finds herself struggling to save the undine and her subjects, not to mention that the Queen of the Mists has plans of her own, and, as if that weren’t bad enough, Oleander de Marelands, the same person responsible for turning Toby into a fish, is back, and just how does Toby’s mother Amandine fit into all this?

There’s a lot going on in this book. The pieces are moving around the board and things are changing. The central mystery isn’t that hard to solve in that the reader will probably know whodunit, it’s the how that keeps the characters (and the reader) guessing. Well, I figured it out as soon as a certain character was introduced, but even then there are a couple of twists and turns to this tale, and by the time it wraps up there are a lot of intriguing developments for future books to explore, and we’re not even halfway through the books that are in print and the series is still going!

As I mentioned in the little intro bit, I’ve been reading these books back to back and I can’t help but feel that I’m missing some of the impact of certain scenes than if I had had the time to wait between installments. Characters I feel like I’ve just come to know start dying left and right. This must be like what reading A Song of Ice and Fire feels like, except I’m fairly certain a few characters in this series have thick enough plot armor to survive for most of it.

That said, the series slowly seems to be becoming a bit more diverse. May Daye (who is honestly one of my favourite characters in this series) brings her South Asian girlfriend to a ball, and characters of colour like Raj are still up and about, but it’s a shame that given the immensity of the world and the variety of Fae on display that it isn’t more diverse. Then again, this is only book four, and I’ve read entire series that don’t even bother. In terms of potentially triggering content, I can’t remember anything specific besides there being a lot of death. It’s one of those books.

This is one of those books where it’s difficult to talk about it without spoiling everything. Suffice it to say that although this book made me sad (and a little angry) I’m intrigued by the possibilities it presents, and the next book deals with selkies! I love selkies, selkies are great!

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