Deck Review: The Starchild Tarot (Akashic traditional size edition) by Danielle Noel

I honestly debated whether I should review a book I just read or finally get to reviewing something that’s been in my review pile for a long time as my first review of 2018. I had actually started writing a review for The Wisdom of Unicorns by Joules Taylor and Danielle Noel, and then I thought “Wait, I haven’t done a review of the Starchild Tarot!”

I went back and forth on this deck for ages before finally purchasing it. People said you really had to click with the deck’s worldview, and at $65 CAD, I wasn’t sure I’d click with it, even though I liked the art. When the “traditional size” borderless edition came out, however, I finally decided that I needed to either take the plunge or stop pining after this deck.

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This edition of the Starchild Tarot comes in a two piece box with gold accents. The cards themselves are 4.75″ x 2.75″ with a wonderful smooth matte finish. The edges have gold matte gilding, giving the cards an antique look. An extra card, “Akashic Records” is included in addition to the usual 78 cards. It comes with a small 170 page companion book that contains everything you need to know in order to use the deck. The book contains instructions for staples like the three card spread and the Celtic Cross, as well as a five card “Akashic” spread, a five card “Starseed” spread, and a seven card “Metatron” spread. Several cards have been renamed: Pentacles are now Crystals, the Fool is Starseed, the Hermit is Serenity, the Hanged Man is Perspective, Death is Transformation, the Devil is Oppression, Judgement is Awakening, and the World is the Universe. The guidebook also lists a variety of correspondences for the major arcana, including chakra, gemstones, symbols, and guides, as well as upright and reversed meanings. The minor arcana only get upright and reversed meanings.

I can say without a doubt that this is one of the most luxurious decks I own. I’d wish more deck creators would do similar things with their decks, but then I wouldn’t be able to afford their decks at all!

The art is what I like to call “cosmic hippie pastel aesthetic” it’s mixed media with a combination of photography, hand drawn art, and paintings and it’s all done in a mix of soft and bold pinks, purples, and blues with some cards being dominated by green or black. The characters are mostly human but there are some cards that feature animals, natural or cosmic features like planets and galaxies, and geometric patterns. The art almost has an elven or fey feel to me.

I’ve been using this deck for everything from “pick me up” readings to readings for other people to readings predicting what will happen on my favourite D&D webseries, Critical Role and it reads like a dream. Sometimes it can be very literal. other times you have to give it a moment to let the message sink in. I just like pulling cards and letting them tell me a story.

You don’t need to subscribe to the idea of starseeds (that is, people who have had past lives on other planets and have chosen to reincarnate here on Earth, though they may feel as if Earth is not their “true” home) in order to use this deck, but it’s important to know that the deck is pretty New Agey. The actual meanings of the cards, however, are consistent with RWS tradition. In fact, my one big gripe with this deck is that even though the text is consistent with tradition, the images are not, and often don’t seem to have anything to do with the meanings in the book. This is why I don’t recommend this deck to beginners unless you’re really prepared to read these cards intuitively. I personally mostly ignore the book and just go with what my gut tells me. It’s such a shame that such a beautiful deck isn’t very accessible to newcomers.

There is some diversity in this deck with models of colour in some cards (like the High Priestess). I really appreciate that all the models are credited with their contact information in the back of the book. There isn’t really anything in terms of sexual or body diversity, but I will say the Two of Cups depicts a woman swimming in the ocean.

I love this deck. I don’t know what else to say about it except that I love it and I’m glad I decided to bite the bullet and add it to my collection. Despite my issues with the New Age Movement in general, this deck has grown on me and it’s definitely in my top ten all time faves. I can’t wait for the Moonchild Tarot and the Work Your Light Oracle from the same artist.