Monthly Archives: February 2018

Review: Fallen Legion: Sins of an Empire

I wasn’t going to review this game, and then I thought “Well, I spent a good chunk of time beating it” so I might as well say a few things about it before I head off to bed.

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The Fallen Legion saga is made up of two games: this one, Sins of an Empire, where you play as Princess Cecille, and Flames of Rebellion for Vita, where you play as the opposite side. In this version of the game, Cecille suddenly finds herself as heiress to an Empire after her father passes away, an empire that is beset with rebellion and corruption, but she also finds herself in possession of a mysterious book that claims it can give her the power to save her people, but at what cost?

I think the best way to describe Fallen Legion is that it’s a side-scrolling action RPG with combat that reminds me of Valkyrie Profile. The Valkyrie in this case is Cecille herself, and the Einherjar are the Exemplars–weapons personified as legendary heroes and conjured by the book. The Exemplars do most of the fighting with Cecille supporting them with magic, if the Exemplars fall, Cecille is basically a sitting duck, so actually it’s the opposite of Valkyrie Profile, more like a tower defense game. The combat is basically the same: your party members are all mapped to specific buttons and you attack with a character by pressing their corresponding button. The characters have a number of action points that dictate how many attacks they can do before they need to recharge, blocking refills their AP. Speaking of blocking, it’s done in real time, so timing your combos and blocks is very important. There’s also a mode you can trigger that gives the Exemplars unlimited AP for a short time. In between battles, you’ll be asked to make choices that influence how the Empire sees you and which bosses you fight.

I bought this because the founder of one of my favourite gaming news sites, Siliconera, is the director, so it’s a shame that I can’t recommend this game at all. The combat sounds great on paper, but in practice it involves mashing the buttons until you win (which I know because I did it) ans spamming the block button. The game also does a really poor job of explaining itself. Certain decisions indicate that a character shifts stances or equips something, but the game never explains what that means. There is a glossary that helpfully explains some things, like that Tributes are buffs, but overall I feel like the game could’ve taken some time in the tutorial to explain this stuff. I also didn’t feel any attachment to the characters at all. Their characterization is so inconsistent. One moment, Cecille will moan about how her talking book needs to eat souls to live, and the next she’s resigned to feeding it. The decisions you make between battles relate to a couple big decisions you can make, but more than once I found myself thinking “who the hell are these people and why do I care?” I just didn’t care.

The art and music are meh. The character portraits are nice if you like anime-style art. Admittedly, the reason I don’t care for the art so much is I had a tough time with a mid-game boss that meant I had to keep repeating the same level over and over. Even so, I didn’t find any of the tracks particularly memorable and the background art and enemy designs get reused a lot. I understand this is a small indy team so obviously I can’t expect AAA quality (although remember Dragon Age 2’s bland environments) but I don’t think bright orange makes the best background colour for a outdoor map.

I really wanted to like this game, but honestly, it’s a mess. It feels like it wants to be an epic tale of politics and betrayal but it just feels cliche and the combat gave me hand cramps from all the button mashing, and in the end I just didn’t want to keep playing once I beat it (not even to get a more satisfying ending). Play Valkyrie Profile, if you want something more recent, try Exist Archive or even Grand Kingdom, skip this one.

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Review: One Salt Sea (October Daye #5)

What’s this? A new (to me) October Daye novel, but with mermaids this time? Sold. Not that I wasn’t intending on reading the whole series regardless, but mermaids. I love mermaids.

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Once again, October Daye is doing all right. She’s a Countess with her own knowe, she’s dating again, she’s even agreed to take a squire. Naturally, as usually happens, a situation arises and it’s up to her to fix things. The situation in this case is that the sons of Duchess Dianda Lorden of the Undersea Duchy of Saltmist have been kidnapped, and if October doesn’t find them in time, the Undersea will go to war against the sidhe of the land.

The world of this series grows with every book, and in this book we’re introduced to a whole other society of sidhe in the Undersea. The Undersea has a very different culture from the land sidhe, with harsher laws but, naturally, great beauty. This isn’t Disney’s The Little Mermaid, that’s for sure. The Undersea adds a whole other dimension to this world, and I hope this isn’t the last I see of it. As the Sea Witch, the Luidaeg gets a fair amount of page time as well. I’ve probably said this a dozen times already, but she’s one of my favourite characters in the entire series, and Quentin, Quentin is adorable, and I love May and Jaz. Honestly most of the characters are just incredibly likeable.

In previous books I complained that October did very little investigating. That seems to be a thing of the past now, now she examines crime scenes, gets her friends to examine evidence (and use their unique talents to help with the investigation), interviews a shady underworld contact, and attempts to escape a would-be assassin while pushing a mermaid who is currently using a wheelchair in one of the most tense action scenes in this series.

In terms of complaints, I felt once again that the villain (even the villain the reader isn’t expecting) was obvious. Once again, Rayselline and the Queen of Mists do bad things because they are nuts. The end chapters also pile on the sad moments (and in one instance, I felt it was a very abrupt “oh yeah so-and-so died”), the one good thing is these events do seem to definitively resolve some subplots so, yay? Again, it might be the fact that I’m practically reading these books back to back, but it seems as if at least one subplot could have stood to go on for a couple more books at least, especially since the character involved was mostly part of the background until now.

Also, this is random, but I think this cover is one of my favourites. It’s bright where the others were dark. It’s just a really cool cover. I really like the covers of this series in general. They avoid the sexualized, impossible poses of most women on covers in the urban fantasy genre.

I’m not really sure what else to say about this book. It seems like when I started writing this I had something much longer planned, but it is late, that might be my problem, writing reviews late at night.

Game Review: Child of Light

It’s February, the month where nothing (usually) really exciting happens in the game industry, the month of some of the fakest holidays in Canada (looking at you, Family Day), the month I just want to be over because it’s another month of snow and misery.

I’m going to put all that aside today, however, because today I review a beautiful game that reads and plays like a fairy tale.

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Child of Light is developed by Ubisoft Montreal and published by Ubisoft. The story revolves around Aurora, the daughter of a duke in 19th century Austria. Aurora’s mother is absent, the narrator informs us, so the lonely duke marries another woman. One day, Aurora takes ill and seemingly dies in her sleep, only to awaken in the mysterious, magical land of Lemuria. Lemuria is currently under the oppressive rule of Queen Umbra, who has hidden away the sun, moon, and stars. Aurora embarks on a quest to restore the celestial bodies and free Lemuria from Umbra’s oppressive regime.

The gameplay consists of exploring 2D environments and occasionally solving light-based, switch-based, or block puzzles with your firefly/wisp friend, Igniculus. Running into enemies initiates combat. Combat is done Grandia style, where icons representing the characters move along a bar at the bottom of the screen. When your characters hit the white bar at the far right, time stops and you can choose actions. Different actions have different casting times, which affect how long it takes to move from the red portion of the bar to the end, which is when the character actually performs the action you gave them. If you manage to hit an enemy while its casting, its attack will be interrupted and it will be pushed back in the turn order. The same thing can happen to you, however, so it’s important to time your actions. Some enemies counter interruptions with attacks or buffs. To help with timing, you can move Igniculus into an enemy’s space and press L2 for him to shine his light in their face, slowing them down. If he runs out of juice, you can use the pauses between turns to touch the shining plants around the field or use a potion to refill his light meter. Igniculus can also shine to heal you or your allies. You can also craft gems, known as Oculi, so that your weapons deal elemental damage or you are protected from certain kinds of damage. Characters can level up and improve their abilities by using skill points.

Aurora assembles a quirky cast of friends on her journey, These include two traveling acrobats, a capitalist mouse, and a fish girl. Unfortunately, I didn’t feel like I got to know many of these characters very well, even in their post-battle conversations. Partly that’s due to the dialogue, partly to the length of the game, even so, they all have their amusing quirks, such as Robert (the aforementioned mouse) putting everything in terms that sound like he’s playing the stock market.

The art and music in this game are phenomenal. The art has a very dreamy watercolor effect, of particular note to me are the trees. My favourite tree being the one with pink leaves. I also love the way Aurora’s hair is animated, as if it’s constantly being blown back by a stiff wind. You can spend ages just flying around in this game, entranced by the animation. The visuals are accompanied by a soundtrack which includes melancholic piano music that plays while you’re exploring the world and dramatic pieces that play during boss fights. The boss tracks are some of my favourites, where ominous chanting and an orchestra really create a sense of urgency. I’ve been playing the final boss theme constantly since I first heard the music in game.

I have two major criticisms of this game. Firstly, it only has two difficulty modes: casual and expert. I played on expert difficulty, which offered a decent challenge but could be very brutal, especially in the game’s early stages. An early boss gave me such grief I was considering swapping to casual just for that fight. A middle of the road difficulty would have been appreciated. The second criticism I have is that while the rhyming dialogue (you read that right, all the dialogue is in rhyme) is charming and fits the theme and style of the game, some of the rhymes are very forced and that broke the flow of the game for me. I love the idea and I bet it was tough to pull it off in the first place, but I still cringed at some of the things the characters were saying.

Child of Light is a beautiful game and the only reason I didn’t play it sooner is because UPlay sucks. It doesn’t try to revolutionize the genre, it’s just a well made, nice game to enjoy along with a cup of hot tea (or your beverage of choice). I don’t know how much time I spent playing it, but the average I’ve seen is about 10 – 15 hours. There are 16 collectable confessions to collect, and some of them can be in out of the way places, which will extend your playtime a little, but don’t go in expecting a 40 hour epic and you’ll be fine.